George Foreman 33 Career Boxing Fights On 10 DVDs With Motion Menus
Overall Quality 8-10
This set comes with full professional motion menus with music, chaptered rounds, complete set in chronological order on 10 high quality DVDs. Includes premium cases and artwork printed on the DVDs.
 
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I'll say this, your shipping on the sets I received today was excellent and your customer service has also been excellent, you guys are, barre none, the best sight on the internet to get motion menus and vhs transfers for collectors of classic fights like myself. I mean, WOW this quality is unprecedented...
 
P.S. THESE MENUS ARE AMAZING, POSITIVELY AMAZING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!. (sorry for yelling, but this is damn fine work sir, damn fine... I am ecstatic with the quality, I haven't been this happy with a purchase since I purchased a $300 CNN Cold War documentary from a local used book store for 10 bucks, and that was years and years ago)
 
J. Davis
Ooltewah, TN
      GEORGE FOREMAN 33 fights on 10 boxing DVDs
Fights Boxing DVD 1
George Foreman vs Wilson (AM)
George Foreman vs Chapulos (Olympic Gold)
George Foreman vs Waldheim
 
 
 
 
 
Fights Boxing DVD 9
George Foreman vs Savarese
George Foreman vs Briggs
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
GEORGE FOREMAN 33 FIGHTS ON 10 BOXING DVDS
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GEORGE FOREMAN 33 fights on 10 boxing DVDS
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Fights Boxing DVD 7
George Foreman vs Moorer
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fights Boxing DVD 4
George Foreman vs J. Young
George Foreman vs Sekorski
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fights Boxing DVD 3
George Foreman vs 5 exhibition
George Foreman vs Ballard (EXH)
George Foreman vs Lyle
George Foreman vs Frazier II
George Foreman vs Ledoux
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fights Boxing DVD 2
George Foreman vs Frazier I
George Foreman vs Roman
George Foreman vs Norton
George Foreman vs Ali
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fights Boxing DVD 5
George Foreman vs Rodrigues
George Foreman vs Lakusta
George Foreman vs Anderson
George Foreman vs Ellis
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
George Foreman vs Hazelton
George Foreman vs Chuvalo
George Foreman vs Peralta
George Foreman vs Pires
George Foreman vs Gullick
 
 
 
 
 
George Foreman vs Qawi
George Foreman vs Cooper
George Foreman vs Cooney
George Foreman vs Jameson
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fights Boxing DVD 6
George Foreman vs Stewart
George Foreman vs Coetzer
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fights Boxing DVD 8
George Foreman vs Schulz
George Foreman vs Grimsley
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fights Boxing DVD 10
George Foreman doumentary
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Title defense versus Ken Norton
Foreman’s next defense was against a much tougher opponent. In 1974, in Caracas, Venezuela, he faced the highly regarded future hall-of-famer Ken Norton (who was 30-2), a boxer noted for his awkward crossed-arm boxing style, crab like defense, and heavy punch (a style Foreman emulated in his comeback), who had broken the jaw of Muhammad Ali in a points victory a year earlier. Norton had a good chin and had performed well against Ali in their two matches, winning the first on points and nearly winning the second. (Norton developed a reputation for showing nerves against heavy hitters, largely beginning with this fight. ) After an even first round, Foreman staggered Norton with an uppercut a minute into round two, buckling him into the ropes. Norton did not hit the canvas but continued on wobbly legs, clearly not having recovered, and shortly he went down a further two times in quick succession, with the referee intervening and stopping the fight. “Ken was awesome when he got going. I didn’t want him to get into the fight”, Foreman said when interviewed years later. This fight became known as the “Caracas Caper”.
 
Foreman had cruised past two of the top names in the rankings. The win gave him a 40-0 record with 37 knockouts.
 
Rumble in the Jungle
Foreman’s next title defence, against Muhammad Ali, was historic. During the summer of 1974, he traveled to Zaire (now the Democratic Republic of the Congo) to defend his title against Ali. The bout was promoted as “The Rumble in the Jungle.”
 
During training in Zaire, Foreman suffered a cut above his eye, forcing postponement of the match for a month. The injury affected his training regimen, as it meant he could not spar in the build-up to the fight and risk the cut being re-opened. He later commented: “That was the best thing that happened to Ali when we were in Africa, the fact that I had to get ready for the fight without being able to box. Foreman later also claimed he was drugged by his trainer prior to the bout. Ali used this time to tour Zaire, endearing himself to the public while taunting Foreman at every opportunity. Foreman was favored, having knocked out both Joe Frazier and Ken Norton with two rounds.
 
When Foreman and Ali finally met in the ring, Ali began more aggressively than expected, outscoring Foreman with superior punching speed. However, Ali quickly realized that this approach required him to move much more than Foreman and would cause him to tire. In the second round, Ali retreated to the ropes, shielding his head and hitting Foreman in the face at every opportunity. Foreman dug vicious body punches into Ali’s sides; however, Foreman was unable to land many big punches to Ali’s Head. The ring ropes, being much looser than usual (Foreman later charged that Angelo Dundee had loosened them, and this story is supported by Norman Mailer in the The Fight), allowed Ali to lean back and away from Foreman’s wild swings and then grab Foreman behind the head, forcing Foreman to expend much extra energy untangling himself. Ali also constantly pushed down on Foreman’s neck but was never warned about doing so. To this day, it is unclear whether Ali’s pre-fight talk of using speed and movement against Foreman had been just a diversionary tactic or whether his use of what became known as the “rope-a-dope” tactic was an improvisation necessitated by Foreman’s constant pressure.
 
In either case, Ali was able to occasionally counter off the ropes with blows to the face and penetrated Foreman’s defense. Ali continued to take heavy punishment to the body and occasionally a hard jolt to the head. Ali later said he was “out on on his feet” twice during the bout. Eventually, Foreman began to tire, and his punches became increasingly wild, losing power in the process. An increasingly confident Ali taunted Foreman throughout the bout. Late in the eighth round, Foreman was left off balance by a haymaker, and Ali sprang off the ropes with a flurry to Foreman’s head, punctuated by a hard right cross that landed flush on the jaw, knocking Foreman down. Muhammad Ali was the first boxer to stop Foreman.